I remember learning once that a theory for why zebras have stripes is because they cause a visual effect that makes the herd blur together, thus deterring predators.

Proof of the importance of repetition and consistency, I suppose?

"Oh hey, the voice of Creed is playing at Brat Fest this weekend, wanna go?"

Clever packaging, Tretorn.

“Many years ago, clicking was the simple answer to this question. The general thought was that if you made your page too long, users would only view and read the top half and glance over or ignore the bottom half. Today, things have changed. Many users do scroll to the end of the page and have no problem doing so. Scrolling has become a second-nature and clicking a chore. As user behavior changes over time, designers need to take that into account in their designs.”

Why Scrolling is the New Click, 01/10/12

I still today in 2014 get into heated discussions about designing web experiences where “above the fold” trumps scrolling. Can you imagine the outrage if Tumblr made us click to see the next post in the dashboard? 

(via bigboxcar)

This is so true.

Feeling pretty good about today’s April Fools’ prank—though not much of a “prank,” more just teasing the boss. Used painters’ tape on the inside to create an outline for Lincoln, got a nice variety of Post-It’s and it turned out pretty well.

(ABE is the name of a new program being implemented, the acronym gets thrown around a lot in the office.) Feeling pretty good about today’s April Fools’ prank—though not much of a “prank,” more just teasing the boss. Used painters’ tape on the inside to create an outline for Lincoln, got a nice variety of Post-It’s and it turned out pretty well.

(ABE is the name of a new program being implemented, the acronym gets thrown around a lot in the office.)

Feeling pretty good about today’s April Fools’ prank—though not much of a “prank,” more just teasing the boss. Used painters’ tape on the inside to create an outline for Lincoln, got a nice variety of Post-It’s and it turned out pretty well.

(ABE is the name of a new program being implemented, the acronym gets thrown around a lot in the office.)

Pretty fun idea, worth checking out (ending soon). Off the Stall

“It began with a curiosity about why the ten most common verbs in the English language are irregular, even though the vast majority of verbs are regular. Their discovery, arrived at through data-mining several centuries’ worth of texts, amounts to a sort of linguistic natural selection: the more frequently an irregular verb is used, the less likely it is to be regularized over time. It was the Ngram Viewer, and access to Google’s vast library of digitized books, that enabled this discovery.”

Mark O’Connell reads “Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture,” a new book by the scientists Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel, founders of the field they call “culturomics”: http://nyr.kr/OBr9bg (via newyorker)

Also:

As striking as these infographics are in their encapsulations of historical truths, they don’t typically tell us anything that we didn’t already know. And this is true of the book as a whole. The data on censorship, for instance, is embedded deep in a luxuriance of padding. We get stuff about how Helen Keller was “a hero to millions, a symbol of the triumph of the human spirit over adversity” and how “Marcel Proust became famous for writing good books,” which is one of those facts so incontrovertibly true that stating it sounds a mysteriously false note. And a data-mining examination of the history of fame, whereby we learn that Adolf Hitler is the most famous person born in the past two centuries (i.e., mentioned in the most books), leads to the insight that “darkness, too, lurks among the n-grams, and no secret darker than this: Nothing creates fame more efficiently than acts of extreme evil. We live in a world in which the surest route to fame is killing people, and we owe it to one another to think about what that means.” After a while, you begin to suspect that this sort of wan reflection might be compensating for the fact that the data itself reveal little that is new.
(via barthel)

But don’t the emperor’s clothes look lovely?

(via barthel)

shortformblog:


prweek:

Guinness pulled its sponsorship of New York City’s annual St. Patrick’s Day parade because of organizers’ longstanding ban against gay and lesbian groups marching openly. Heineken also dropped its sponsorship due to the dispute, and New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio will become the first mayor in decades to sit out the parade.  In Boston, Sam Adams pulled its sponsorship of the city’s St. Patrick’s Day parade on Sunday because of a similar ban against LGBT marchers, and Boston Mayor Martin Walsh declined to participate.

When you’ve lost the beer companies, clearly you’re doing something wrong.


It seems silly, but this feels like such a big step. How can you afford to discriminate if no one will help you pay for it?

shortformblog:

prweek:

Guinness pulled its sponsorship of New York City’s annual St. Patrick’s Day parade because of organizers’ longstanding ban against gay and lesbian groups marching openly. Heineken also dropped its sponsorship due to the dispute, and New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio will become the first mayor in decades to sit out the parade.

In Boston, Sam Adams pulled its sponsorship of the city’s St. Patrick’s Day parade on Sunday because of a similar ban against LGBT marchers, and Boston Mayor Martin Walsh declined to participate.

When you’ve lost the beer companies, clearly you’re doing something wrong.

It seems silly, but this feels like such a big step. How can you afford to discriminate if no one will help you pay for it?

futurejournalismproject:

Juoksentelisinkohan

An important question to pose oneself from time to time.

Lynda Barry is the coolest. (New cover for On Wisconsin.)

Found this while cleaning out files from a previous coworker. Proof that “millennial” is just a synonym for “new generation of young people”?